How to Clear Cloudy Swimming Pool Water

There are few things that can stop a pool party altogether—one of these things is cloudy swimming pool water. Cloudy water can be potentially dangerous, so never swim if your water looks less than clear. Testing your pool chemistry can determine whether this issue is caused by a chemical imbalance...

    There are few things that can stop a pool party altogether—one of these things is cloudy pool water. Cloudy water can be potentially dangerous, so never swim if your water looks less than clear. Testing your pool chemistry can determine whether this issue is caused by a chemical imbalance or whether your problem is algae.

    Why Pools Get Cloudy

    Cloudy pool water is simply the presence of something that in not meant to be in the water. Whether it is dirt, algae or too much of a certain chemical, it’s an issue that can seem to occur overnight.

    Pools may get cloudy because of a poor filtration system–if your pool gets cloudy, be sure to replace the filter and ensure your pump is properly circulating water.

    The Cause of Cloudy Pool Water

    The cause of your cloudy water is easily determined by the color of your pool. If the water takes on a green or yellowish color, your problem is very likely algae. The easiest way to treat algae is to use a calcium hypochlorite treatment, or in simple terms, using a pool shock.

    Take a look at our article on how to remove algae to help treat your case of pool algae.

    If your water takes on a colorless or white-ish cloudiness, your problem may be chemical. Test your pool water using test strips to find which chemical is causing the issue.

    Clearing Cloudy Water

    A simple way to clear your pool is to use a clarifier. A clarifier works with your pool filter to bind and catch smaller particles. It can help to clear up excess chemicals and debris in the water. These work best at lower levels of pool cloudiness.

    You can also use a flocculant to clear your water. They work much like clarifiers, but the particles are too big to be filtered and will sink to the bottom of your pool. This debris will have to be cleaned manually using a pump.

    For more information on how to lower the presence of specific chemicals, visit our post on pool water chemistry. For more information on how to care for your pool, visit our blog on Pool Care.

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